Church of the Resurrection

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Ministry: Worship

Why We Celebrate Pentecost

May 29, 2017

Every family has its own birthday traditions. In my husband's family, you were allowed to eat sugary cereal and stay in your pajamas and play video games all day. In mine, we picked our favorite meal and cake and helped my mom cook them. Interestingly enough, the Church has her own birthday tradition. In it, her people wear red and eat bread and drink wine and celebrate baptisms. This tradition is called Pentecost, and it is our spiritual birthday.

The story of Pentecost is remarkable. The apostles and Jesus' followers are all gathered together to celebrate the Jewish feast of Shavuot, which celebrates Moses' descent from Mount Sinai with the Ten Commandments. Suddenly, the sound of a strong wind descends from heaven and they are each crowned with tongues of flame. Perhaps, having followed Jesus around and seen his miracles, this did not faze them too much. But then something happened that changed their lives–and ours–forever: they were filled with the power of the Holy Spirit. Before that moment they were individual followers of Jesus, but when the Holy Spirit descended, the Church as we know her was born.

I don't know about you, but I still get excited when my birthday rolls around. I begin anticipating days beforehand, and it saddens me when a close friend or family member forgets it. It stands to reason then that I should get excited when I know Pentecost is coming. With the coming of the Holy Spirit, the church body grew from a small group of Israelites to an international force. On this feast day we at Resurrection join in celebration with our fellow body members all over the world and rejoice that God has given us his Spirit and in doing so united us as one Body. Now there's a true cause for celebration.

Remember to wear red or another bright “fire" color like orange or yellow on Pentecost.

A Peek into Holy Week: The Great Vigil of Easter

April 10, 2017

In preparation for Holy Week, we've been taking a peek into each of the three services that compose the Easter Triduum. We meet the presence of the Jesus in his servanthood and his body on Maundy Thursday. We encounter the intense love of Jesus on Good Friday in his sacrificial death. Our journey comes to its conclusion in the Great Vigil of Easter where we tell the story of God's saving deeds and fully encounter the resurrection Christ in his fully-alive glory.

The Great Vigil of Easter is the crowning jewel of Holy Week; it begins after sunset on Holy Saturday and extends through the night, culminating in a sunrise Easter Acclamation service. Of all the services celebrated during Holy Week, the Easter Vigil is the oldest known service of the week. The earliest references to the Vigil are found in the second century AD. In the third and fourth centuries, Christians believed this was the most significant holy day for new Christians to declare their faith and become full members of the family of God. The Easter Vigil celebrates the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead and looks forward to his coming again in glory to fully reconcile the world to himself.

The Easter Vigil has four important parts: the Service of Light, the Service of Lessons, baptism and confirmation, and the Eucharist. The Service of Light is often referred to as the Exsultet. The light represents our passage from the darkness of death on Good Friday into the light of life on Easter Sunday. It is at this time that the Paschal Candle is lit from a new fire outside of the church. Clergy members then process into the sanctuary with the light. As they reach the doors of the sanctuary, they stop and knock prior to entering. As the Paschal Candle enters the room, it is the only light. The Paschal Candle will burn during every service through Easter until Pentecost.

For the rest of the night, we celebrate the Liturgy of the Word, or the vigil readings. At Resurrection, we spend one hour exploring each reading through worship, an original song, preaching, and prayer. It is a time for us to slow down and dig deeply into the story of salvation presented to us through the vigil readings. It is also an opportunity for the many lay preachers and worship leaders at Resurrection to have an opportunity to lead. Throughout history, the number of readings has varied. There are nine readings currently found in the Book of Common Prayer, and at Resurrection we add a tenth passage for the second reading—the Fall.

At 6am the Easter Acclamation service begins, and candidates for baptism are presented even as the congregation renews their own baptismal vows. Finally, we reach the moment that we wait for anxiously during Lent and all of Holy Week: the Easter Acclamation and the Holy Noise. The celebrant exclaims to the people: "Alleluia, Christ is risen!" And the people respond: "The Lord is risen, indeed! Alleluia!" At this time, we shout and sing and dance as we celebrate the hope given to us all those many years ago on that first Easter Sunday morning, and we rejoice in the expectation of the return of Christ in the future. 

Watch the video of that moment below: 

This is truly the greatest moment of the entire year.  We then conclude the service by celebrating the Eucharist, enjoying together the meal that makes us one with Jesus' body and blood and unites us with the church throughout the ages. The Eucharist reminds us throughout the year of the death and resurrection of Jesus which we celebrate during Holy Week, and the first Eucharist of Easter is an especially poignant moment as it concludes our Holy Week pilgrimage.

At Resurrection, the Great Vigil of Easter is the most widely beloved service of the liturgical year. We experience a greater sense of unity both with one another and with the Lord in the celebration of the triumph over death. 

Join us Saturday, 4/15, at 7:30pm through the night into Sunday, 4/16, at 6am to experience and celebrate Jesus' resurrection.