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Posts by: Ellen Richard

A Peek into Holy Week: The Great Vigil of Easter

March 25, 2016

The-Great-Vigil-of-Easter

The following is an excerpt from A Guide to Holy Week. Check it out to learn more about each service during Holy Week and find a brief devotional to help you prepare to hear from God during Holy Week.

In preparation for Holy Week, we've been taking a quick peek into each of the three services that compose the Easter Triduum. We meet the presence of the Jesus in his servanthood and his body on Maundy Thursday. We encounter the intense love of Jesus on Good Friday in his sacrificial death. Our journey comes to its conclusion in the Great Vigil of Easter where we tell the story of God's saving deeds and fully encounter the resurrection Christ in his fully-alive glory.

The Great Vigil of Easter is the crowning jewel of Holy Week; it begins after sunset on Holy Saturday and extends through the night, culminating in a sunrise Easter Acclamation service. Of all the services celebrated during Holy Week, the Easter Vigil is the oldest known service of the week. The earliest references to the Vigil are found in the second century AD. In the third and fourth centuries, Christians believed this was the most significant holy day for new Christians to declare their faith and become full members of the family of God. The Easter Vigil celebrates the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead and looks forward to his coming again in glory to fully reconcile the world to himself.

The Easter Vigil has four important parts: the Service of Light, the vigil readings, baptism and confirmation, and the Eucharist. The Service of Light is often referred to as the Exsultet. The light represents our passage from the darkness of death on Good Friday into the light of life on Easter Sunday. It is at this time that the Paschal Candle is lit from a new fire outside of the church. Clergy members then process into the sanctuary with the light. As they reach the doors of the sanctuary, they stop and knock prior to entering. As the Paschal Candle enters the room, it is the only light. The Paschal Candle will burn during every service through Easter until Pentecost.

For the rest of the night, we celebrate the Liturgy of the Word, or the vigil readings. At Resurrection, we spend one hour exploring each reading through worship, an original song, preaching, and prayer. It is a time for us to slow down and dig deeply into the story of salvation presented to us through the vigil readings. It is also an opportunity for the many lay preachers and worship leaders at Resurrection to have an opportunity to lead. Throughout history, the number of readings has varied. There are nine readings currently found in the Book of Common Prayer, and at Resurrection we add a tenth passage for the second reading—the Fall.

At 6am the Easter Acclamation service begins, and candidates for baptism are presented even as the congregation renews their own baptismal vows. Finally, we reach the moment that we wait for anxiously during Lent and all of Holy Week: the Easter Acclamation and the Holy Noise. The celebrant exclaims to the people: "Alleluia, Christ is risen!" And the people respond: "The Lord is risen, indeed! Alleluia!" At this time, we shout and sing and dance as we celebrate the hope given to us all those many years ago on that first Easter Sunday morning, and we rejoice in the expectation of the return of Christ in the future. This is truly the greatest moment of the entire year.
We then conclude the service by celebrating the Eucharist, enjoying together the meal that makes us one with Jesus' body and blood and unites us with the church throughout the ages. The Eucharist reminds us throughout the year of the death and resurrection of Jesus which we celebrate during Holy Week, and the first Eucharist of Easter is an especially poignant moment as it concludes our Holy Week pilgrimage.

At Resurrection, the Great Vigil of Easter is the most widely beloved service of the liturgical year. We experience a greater sense of unity both with one another and with the Lord in the celebration of the triumph over death.

Join us Saturday, 3/26, at 7:30pm through the night into Sunday, 3/26, at 6am to experience and celebrate God's saving deeds.

A Peek into Holy Week: Good Friday

March 19, 2016

Good-Friday

The following is an excerpt from A Guide to Holy Week. Check it out to learn more about each service during Holy Week and find a brief devotional to help you prepare to hear from God during Holy Week.

In the days leading up to Holy Week, we're taking time to prepare our hearts and minds so that we will be ready to hear the voice of the Lord. Holy Week is always a time of close communion with Jesus as we walk with him toward his death and resurrection. As we continue to anticipate Holy Week, we take a peek into Good Friday.

Good Friday is the service that is a solemn remembrance of Jesus' sacrifice of his own life so that we might find forgiveness and reconciliation with God. This is not a somber recapitulation of Jesus' death, but rather a thankful and reverently joyful recollection of his death that gave us life. This day and the next—Holy Saturday—are the only two days of the church calendar when there is no Eucharistic celebration. Traditionally, this service can be held at three o'clock in the afternoon or later to mark the hour of Jesus' death according to the Gospels.

It is believed that the liturgy for this service is derived from the earliest days of Christianity. The service begins in silence and with prayer. The clergy process into the room silently, dressed in black. In some traditions, they prostrate themselves before the cross at this point. Our readings for the day are from Isaiah's Suffering Servant poem (Isa. 52:13­–53:12) and from the sermon to the Hebrews in which the author explains Jesus' role as our great High Priest and Mediator (Heb. 10:1-25). At this time, we return to the same Gospel reading that we read on Palm Sunday—the Passion (John 18:1–19:37). This service also includes the praying of the Solemn Collects in which we intercede for the church, our nation, and the world. Our Communion for this service consists of wafers that have already been blessed during the previous night's Maundy Thursday Eucharist. Good Friday is not a Eucharist service because we are remembering that Christ's body was in the grave, and we are waiting for his resurrected body to bring us new life. Finally, we take time to venerate the cross. At Church of the Resurrection, we lay the cross down on the chancel stage, and all who are led take a few minutes to touch the cross and pray. It is a powerful time of connection to our sacrificial Savior.

In the pilgrimage of Holy Week, Good Friday brings us to a somber and contemplative halt. From the moment the silent procession enters the sanctuary until we all leave in silence, we are invited into a focused contemplation of Jesus' death on the cross. Each scripture reading, prayer, and song points us to one man's experience on an ancient instrument of torture. Why? Because we believe that the moment Jesus died on the cross was the moment the entire world was rescued from sin and death. That is why we spend so much time savoring the reality of the cross.

On Good Friday, we celebrate both the specific instant in history when Jesus redeemed us and the reality that it can meet us in our sinfulness today. We invite the Holy Spirit to give us the grace to acknowledge our personal sinfulness and and then to immediately find forgiveness available at the cross. It is a stunningly personal opportunity to ask the Lord to highlight the sins keeping us from drawing close to him and then to set those sins down on the wood of the cross.

Join us Friday, 3/25, at 7pm to experience the forgiveness and healing found in our remembrance of Christ's death on the Cross.